a new england culinary festival

September 22, 2016


cottagefarm-krissyosheaphotography-2016-4This past weekend I had the pleasure of attending the 2016 WGBH Food & Wine Festival. A Boston based 4 day event filled to the brim with the promise of live music, toothsome bites, local and global libations, cheeses and a veritable assortment of cooking demonstrations.cottagefarm-krissyosheaphotography-2016-12It was a lovely surprise to be invited by Wolf Gourmet to partake in this annual food-centric festival.  With a tent full of amazing local restaurants, breweries, cheesemonger, ice-cream makers and vintners, I knew it was going to be a day of ineffable culinary delights

After quite literally stopping to smell the roses, I made my way into the  Artisan Taste tent. Row after row of tasty little bites and a veritable collection of beverages were laid out in long inviting lines down the tent. cottagefarm-krissyosheaphotography-2016-6cottagefarm-krissyosheaphotography-2016-1My first stop to the Wolf Gourmet & Fine Cooking table where I picked up the two latest copies of the magazine and ogled the elegant cookware on display. Simple clean beautiful stainless steel lines …. need i say more?

There was truly a profusion of talent under this particular roof! I  diligently worked my way up and down there aisles looking, smelling, chatting and or course tasting! So many wonderful and creative treats but, a few standouts. One an exquisitely crafted spoonful of creamy uni panacotta, fresh local welfleet oyster and delicate ikura from Ben Steigers of Pabu Izakaya. It showcased all the sweet briny goodness of the Welfeets and the texture of the panacotta was out of this world and was so unexpected! I’ve never had anything like it. I had two on Saturday, in the name of research!cottagefarm-krissyosheaphotography-2016-10The other wildly unexpected treat was the FOMU icecream. I’m not normally one for icecream but the nondairy no sugar added pitch intrigued me. I’m rather glad it did as the Tahitian Vanilla with toasted walnuts was a showstopper. And FOMU have a shop locally – danger!cottagefarm-krissyosheaphotography-2016-9cottagefarm-krissyosheaphotography-2016-2The other highlight for me were the cooking demonstrations.  Throughout the day, and with the assistance of the aforementioned Wolf Gourment cookware, chefs taught and cooked for engaged audiences. I loved this backbone of the event allowing those of us attending to really participate with the chefs and learn more about their methods and ideas. Truly inspiring and a really fabulous addition to the event.

All in all a wonderful day out and one I hope to attend again next year!cottagefarm-krissyosheaphotography-2016-7

this post is sponsored by wolf gourmet. all opinions are my own

chilled zucchini and yogurt soup

July 30, 2016

wolfgourmet.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-8wolfgourmet.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016 wolfgourmet.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-9wolfgourmet.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-7 It is firmly mid summer now. The long hot days and torrid nights tell me so. That, and the welcome sound of crickets and cicada wings and evening skies that twinkle with the light of fireflies. I love that summer effortlessly evokes a childlike sense of freedom. Something that seems to lie quiet the rest of the year. Even as an adult summer is the season of no rules; staying up long into the evening, neglecting chores in favor of spontaneous beach trips, swimming out deep into the cool green waters of the atlantic.

And there is part of me that thinks perhaps this clarity of inner child on these sweltering summer days affords me the opportunity to see things in a simpler light. To unpack and uncomplicated the life I live the rest of the year. Leaving it behind in favor of salty beach hair, bare feet, and lazy outside dinners. continue reading

two summery sips cocktails & a masonshaker giveaway

July 22, 2016

masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-8masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-9masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-6 masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-5 I can envision dappled sunlight filtering down through the leaves of the apples. Their branches bowing under the weight of a thousands of young bright green fruit. There is a table under these branches and pitchers of water are dotted along its length, catching the light and throwing it in large angular patterns across the surface. An easy-going Sunday sort of music can be heard and people are wandering about the garden nibbling on various crostini, cheeses and fruit. Some have cocktails in hand as the stoop to admire a flower or reach toward one another in greeting.

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rye berry salad and an event recap

July 13, 2016

cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-7 Cooking for a crowd is something for which I have the very greatest affection; the menu planning, ingredient shopping, kitchen prep and especially, those last few moments before the meal begins and everyone is seated together at the table. I even love the clean up. Washing and putting away all the plates and flatware and large platters; I ones I only ever use when serving a crowd.

Unsurprisingly, the Wednesday before my recent Boston workshop which I hosted with guest teacher Betty Liu, in the midst of all the bustling and prepping, I felt that familiar infectious excited happiness I always feel before an event. I could feel it bubbling up as I was driving back to the farm, windows down and heady hay scented summer air rushing in and a load of beautiful Five Fork Farms blooms in tow. I began to feel intoxicated with happiness . In less than 24 hours, accompanied by two of the loveliest food bloggers I know, Betty & Valentina, I would be standing in my kitchen, cooking for a crowd. We were preparing a lunch which relied on fresh ingredients, prepared simply, and using as much gorgeous produce from my gardens at CottageFarm as possible. Our gardens at the farm have been producing at such a rapid rate it was wonderful to have an excuse to cook up a big meal to share! To showcase without overworking or overcomplicating things is always my desired method of preparation. I simply want the food to be at its best and freshest and for this to shine through.  continue reading

grilled radicchio with olives and anchovy over egg fettuccine

June 13, 2016

cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-59 Food, and gathering together at the table have an undeniable ability to create the greatest sense of comfort. Easy, unfussy food and a convivial attitude are the perfect catalysts to entice us to relax into the experience and linger at the table. When I dream of the perfect evening it is one full of the ebbs and flows of chatter and laugher over music, around a table laden with dishes and a distinctly unhurried feeling. Nothing brings me greater pleasure than seeing the table in the morning strewn with the odd dish or two and that new pair of taper candlesticks having all but burned away to tiny nubs.

The recipe below is one I have been making rather a lot lately, due in part to its ability to encourage a sense of comfort and invite us to linger at the table just a bit longer. The other reason for its successive appearance is that it includes moving the kitchen from the indoor ovens to the open fire of the outdoor grill. There is something about cooking over the open flame; it brings new flavor and possibility to ordinary foods. Grilling is also an excuse to stand outside, something I never miss to opportunity to do, with a glass of wine or the ubiquitous summer g & t in hand and enjoy the beauty of the season and the company of friends and family while you cook. It seems all the more social to cook on the grill, with people strolling up to chat and refresh drinks and take a turn maneuvering whatever is cooking over the flame. As the cook you can be in the center of the action as opposed to cordoned off away in the kitchen.

cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-56 cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-57 Finally I love this dish because it uses one of my favorite ingredients, radicchio. Grilling the radicchio, it’s as if it gives up its secret. Over the fire it transforms from a bitter stiff leaved chicory to something so much sweeter becoming supple and delicate . I am always amazed at how simply dressing it with a bit of salt and pepper and olive oil is so transformative when coupled with the grill. Even without pasta , the radicchio is worth making. It is lovely over a garlic white bean puree, or mixed in with simple greens for added texture. Its sweet smoky flavour also lend well to being smothered in chopped egg and drizzle with a bit of dressing and capers. I just love grilling up large deep red quarters of radicchio and watching as they turn to a beautiful deep plummy caramel.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-60

Use a fresh egg pasta. Cook it until it is only just tender, you want it to retain its toothsomeness.  Coupled with the tender smoky sweet radicchio and the richness from the olives and the brine from the anchovy this dish comes together in a way that is so satisfying I can only name it as true comfort food.

A little note on the olives and anchovies – if possible try to get cured olives rather than brined. they will be dark and wrinkly, not the prettiest, but their flavor is deep and dark and wont compete with the salt or brine of the anchovy. For the anchovy, I use the white fillets – they are brined rather than salt packed and have a fresh bright taste and do not require the same prep as the salt packed. I also love a tangy slice or two over a piece of baguette.

Egg fettuccine with Grilled Radicchio

serves 2

  • 1/2lb or 250g fresh egg fettuccine
  • 1 medium head of radicchio
  • 3 white anchovies  (brine preferably)
  • 1 Tsp chopped fresh rosemary
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 cup reserved pasta water
  • zest 1/2 lemon
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 Tbsp fresh chopped chives
  • 1/2 cup cured black olives
  • salt and pepper

Remove the outer leaves of the radicchio and trim the stem end. then cut the radicchio in half along the vertical and agin into quarters. you want to ensure that you have cut each wedge with a bit of the stem still on so that they hold together on the grill. Coat in olive oil then sprinkle them with salt and pepper. Place on the grill and turn every few minutes until sides are beautifully charred and the radicchio is tender. aprox 6-8 minutes. Let stand until you are ready to serve

Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil add 2-3 Tbsp salt and return to a boil

In a small saute pan warm 3 Tbsp olive oil and add the smashed garlic cloves stir until fragrant. Then add the chopped fresh rosemary and saute again until fragrant. Then add the anchovy filets and saute until slightly crisp, breaking them up with the back of a wooden spoon as you go. Remove from heat and discard garlic cloves. Then stir in the parsley and lemon zest. Let it stand-off the heat while you make the pasta.

Add your fettuccine to the boiling water. Stir and test after 1 minute for doneness. Depending upon the freshness of your pasta, it may take anywhere from 1 -5 minutes to cook. Be careful not to over cook. Reserve 1/2 cup of the cooking water and drain the pasta.

Then add it to the saute pan with the anchovy mixture, toss well to coat. If needed add a little of the cooking water, bit by bit, until the noodles are coated well and evenly in the mixture. Then stir through the olives and plate the pasta. Add grilled radicchio quarters to each plat and sprinkle with fresh chives and a good crack of fresh black pepper cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-58


Boston Photography Immersion Class

June 1, 2016


Workshop with guest teacher Betty Liu

Thursday, June 23rd + Friday, June 24th 2016

Dinner | Loyal Nine Restaurant, East Cambridge MA

Workshop | Warehouse XI, Union Square Somerville MA

Time | 6:30-9:30pm Thursday & 8:30am – 5pm Friday

Price | $475
Belkin Lookout Farm Edible Boston-18MV WORKSHOP -62I’m so excited to be hosting my first event here on the ground in Boston and I couldn’t think of a lovelier or more talented photographer to join me as a guest teacher than Betty Liu

Betty is not only a masterly photographer but an inspired cook with a gorgeous food blog and incredible command of flavours and ingredients. I am always inspired by her kitchen wizardrycottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-255Together, Krissy & Betty will help you to learn camera basics and the process of photography including, how to use natural light, incorporating the human element and setting up a shot.

Please join us on Thursday 23 June for a dinner at Loyal Nine, one of the nation’s most creative and innovative new restaurants. Here we will enjoy offerings from their seasonally inspired colonialist revival menu and get to know one another. There will be a bit of a discussion over dinner on discovering inspirations and social media but mostly we can just kick back get to know new friends, enjoying good food and the conviviality of the table.  

The following day, Friday 24 June will be spent at WarehouseXI making images through hands on instruction. Our day will start with a light breakfast where we will dive right into shooting! Betty & Krissy will begin with a discussion on how to use a camera and will share their knowledge, experience and understanding of photography & the creative process. You will learn how to create and shoot still life scenes, how to use natural light, camera mechanics, prop selection and scene creation. Gathering again at the lunch table, we will have time to consider the mornings teachings and engage in a Q&A session. In the afternoon we will roll off into small groups so that you may set-up a scene to shoot yourself; building upon the morning’s lessons with guidance from Krissy & Betty.

In addition, you will also have an opportunity to shoot a live scenes and learn to capture movement during our cocktail making demonstration. A guest bartender will be creating something special just for us! And mixing it up on the day – a great opportunity to capture process in action.

Equipment needed | DSLR camera with manual setting options, Lens or lenses, Batteries and charger, Notebook

Please contact Krissy @ krissyoshea@gmail.com to reserve your spot 

*Please know that due to nature of the event, payment must be made in full at the time of registration and can not be refunded. Price of the ticket includes all dinner, breakfast and lunch costs and a cocktail.Zucchini Lemon Cake _ bettysliu-4



fiddle head and dill weed omelette

May 17, 2016

fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-2fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016

fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-5fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-11I still remember where I was, the meal I was having when I first came across fiddlehead ferns. In the tiny raw-wood panelled dining room of Kitchen Table Bistro in Vermont on one of those balmy spring evenings, just as it is now sitting at my desk writing this. The windows were opened, just a crack, and the new season breeze gently puffed at the beeswax candles on the tables. I watched as candlelight flickered over the wine blushed cheeks of the other guests. We ordered a bottle of sweet minerally white which was on our table sweating slightly in the warmth of the dining room – little beads of water running to the bottom of the bottle and pooling in a damp ring on the tablecloth.  We sat and sipped, drinking it all in – the wine, the atmosphere; all of it.

And out came a taste from the kitchen; a tiny homemade brioche toasts with spring pea pure and the most delicate slice of house smoked trout caught from the river further down the road. I remember loving the buttery richness of the toast and the way the smoke from the trout stayed on my tongue until I washed it down with a cool sip of wine. fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-7fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-9

We had asked the server to bring us what he thought was the nicest of the first courses that evening.  Each choice had sounded as wonderful as the next and we were indecisive and caught up in the romance of the evening, too giddy to make the decision ourselves. A perfectly elegant plate of fritto misto arrived. Not a mound of fried things but rather an incredible considered plate of fine spring vegetables accented by a verdant herb sauce strategically painted in swaths on the plate. There were flowers too, bright yellow and purple, sprinkled about the vegetables and they looked beautiful against the green. And so we began to sip again on our minerally wine and nibble at the vegetables wrapped in golden lighter than air batter. So light in fact that instead of weighing down the tiny spring parsnip, mushroom or ramp it somehow brought out the succulent flavor of each. And on that plate were also a few perfect fiddle heads – tasting of fresh spring earth, bright and citrus like asparagus but deeply earthy like spinach. I was elated and intrigued having tasted something I hadn’t known before and queried the server about them. He graciously gave me the explanation of their origins, young unfurled fern fronds foraged from the Vermont woods. His own affection for these rather unusual spring vegetables pronounced in his wide grin and excited tone. Since this meal I often though of our server that night as I too excitedly awaited the arrival of fiddleheads each spring. They have become something of a harbinger of spring and feel like a great reward after winter’s limited produce. I regularly find myself overcome with a feeling of elation and excitement when standing in front of a stall at the farmers market and seeing fiddleheads for the first time in spring.fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-4

The key to this recipe is to use the freshest and most delicious ingredients possible. As with all simple things, it is the quality which makes this humble omelet extraordinary. Try and find the freshest eggs and the most plump green fiddleheads you can. Of course this omelet is wonderful for breakfast but I think of it more as a meal or lunch or dinner. It is especially lovely served with a simple mescaline salad and a cold glass of white wine.

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Pistachio Granola with Poached Pears

May 3, 2016


I noticed this morning that the dogwood has flowered. Tiny dark, muddy pink flowers, more hull than petal. And in another week or so the tree will be a swath of most delicate light pink across a greening background. The lilac is starting too. A few more warm afternoons and they should be ready for cutting. I cant wait to fill the house with vessels full. I am caught up in the tactile world of spring. Each day the landscape shifts perceptibly before me as leaves burst forth and flowers spring open. One day seems to bleed into the next with no clear end or beginning. Just a continuous unfurling the days vacillating between blissfully warmth and raw wetness and nights which are still decidedly cool, cold even.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-11cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-7cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-9But, gone is the fierceness of winter. The tempestuous winds have died away and the acuminous cold no longer strikes you when you step outside. On morning walks over the fields and through city streets alike, it is still chilly. The dark coldness of night having settled in the wee hours and continuing to lingers into the mornings. Admittedly thought this hasn’t stopped me from opening the windows before going to bed. There is something peaceful about drifting off to sleep wrapped up in heavy layers of blankets with the cold on my cheeks and a symphony of peepers call out over the night. It is something I relish with childlike delight.

In the mornings  I make my way to the kitchen wrapped in woolen jumper, toes tucked warmly into slippers. I fill the kettle and place it on the stove, light the burner, watching as its great blue flame leaps up against the shivery morning. I often wrap myself in an additional shawl while waiting for the kettle, knowing these layers will be shed before afternoons arrival. But still, the added layers and warmth of hot tea are a necessity. So to is a warming breakfast. But, it feels to late in the season for hearty bowls of squash porridge and to early for light sweet fruit. Not that any is readily available just yet anyway.

I often eat a bowl of miso soup for breakfast this time of year. I love its earthy salty broth and the addition of a few cubes are tofu make for a wholesome beginning. But there are days I crave something  equally as satisfying with a bit less broth and a little hint of sweet. For those days, I have been making up big batches of pistachio granola and topping it with spicy poached pears.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-2cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-3Alone, or with a dollop of thick natural yogurt beneath, this breakfast seems to straddle the gap of cold mornings and warmer days just perfectly. The granola gets a richness from the olive oil and the most delightful crunchy clusters form around the pistachios as it bakes. The baking of the oats and honey have a magic of their own. They perfume the mornings wrapping the house in a kind of warm spell and chasing away the last of the nights chill.

Pistachio Granola with Honey Poached Pears

for the granola

  • 1 cup oats
  • 1/2 cups oat bran
  • 1/3 raw shelled pistachios
  • 1/4 hemp seeds
  • 1/4 sesame seeds
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp sweet extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 tsp garam marsala
  • 1/4 tsp freshly grated cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • pinch of salt
  1. preheat oven to 410 degrees
  2. spread all the dry ingredients on a large parchment lined baking sheet.
  3. Drizzled with the honey and olive oil and toss well to combine
  4. spread in a thin even covering on the baking sheet and bake for 10/12 minutes or until golden – being carefull not to burn.
  5. remove from the oven and let it cool so the granola becomes crunchy

for the pears

  • 1 bosc pear- pealed, cored and cut in half
  • 2 cup water
  • 1/2 tsp whole cloves
  • 1/4 tsp fennel seeds
  • 1.5 tbs honey
  1. add spices, honey and water to a small sauce pan
  2. bring liquid to a boil
  3. drop in pear halves, reduce to rapid simmer, cover & cook about 15 min or until pears are tender.
  4. at this point remove the pears –  continue to reduce the poaching liquid until it becomes a syrup like consistency if desired or simply discard. this may take up to 30 mins. The syrup is lovely drizzled over the granola and pear but not necessary

spoon a small amount of natural yogurt into a bowl and place warm pear on top. Then sprinkle generously with granola


Red Onion and Walnut Tart

April 13, 2016

blog.krissyosheaphotography2016-4 blog.krissyosheaphotography2016-7It is said that necessity is the mother of invention and in the case of this recipe, that is exactly what happened.

This invention was born on one of those days of one of those weeks. A white rabbit sort of a week. The kind where you spend the whole week rushing around never knowing quite what day it is and perpetually shouting, either into the phone or just in your own head, “im late! im late”

And then comes Friday, and all you want to do is sigh a great sigh of relief and relax, perhaps pour a little glass of red wine and have something which feels very decent and indulgent on the table.

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Food and Lifestyle Photography and Styling Workshop in Croatia




Join Sanda of LittleUpsideDownCake & me for a 5 night photography and lifestyle retreat in Croatia.


This October (5th – 9th) we will call the tiny island of Zlarin home. Set just a few miles offshore from the Croatian mainland, this picturesque island is one of the only a handful on the Adriatic Sea where  cars are not allowed, making it an idyllic spot to nurture the imagination and encourage relaxation.


Tucked away in this beautifully rugged little seaside paradise, dotted with fig and cypress trees, we will have the chance to fill our lungs with fresh salty air and awaken our creative spirits. Here, in this intimate setting, we will delve into the creative process, exploring the art of photography and styling. You will learn how to create, shoot & style still life scenes and we will discuss the use of natural light, camera mechanics, prop selection and scene creation.


Over the 5 days, we will also explore the local lifestyle and regional cuisine of the island from leisurely al fresco lunches in the garden to boat rides on the brilliant blue Adriatic. A visit to one of the area’s most well known vineyard is also on the itinerary.  


While days will be dedicated to learning and exploration, evenings will focus on the simple joys of gathering, sharing meals and  the camaraderie of conversation. This time to reflect and relax is as important as our information filled days to fostering the creative process and finding personal inspiration. Our rustic island house will serve as the gathering space for us throughout the workshop and its large table a lively assembling place.


We hope you will join us in Croatia this October! We look forward to meeting you.

_MG_8081 lisbon.krissyosheaphotography2015-7_MG_8556


– dates: 5th – 9th of October

–  island Zlarin, Croatia

– price: 1400€

– 10 participants

– 3 whole days of food and lifestyle photography

– 4 breakfasts

– 3 lunches

– 4 dinners

– drinks and snacks during the workshop


Transportation, outings and accommodation covered in the cost of the ticket

Nearest major airports are Zadar and Split  

There are daily ferries to and from the mainland. Ferries leave from Sibenik

Please note, airfare and transportation to the workshop is not included in the ticket price

Rooms and beds are shared (*or you have the option to arrange your own accommodation on the island, if you do not wish to share beds)

Deposit of 50% is needed for registration and a final payment will be due August 31, 2016.

There will be no refunds on cancellation.

For reservation please contact us on: krissyoshea@gmail.com or little.upside.down.cake@gmail.com and we will send you more details.MG_6927  cottagefarmcity.krissyosheaphotography2016-37