Tag Archives: new england

APPLE GALETTE WITH CARDAMOM CRUST

October 19, 2018

I love greeting the first few chilly mornings of autumn and can usually be found, shoulders wrapped, sitting in the kitchen alone with the steely blue light, hands clasped around a mug of tea. These moments of transition are always my most favorite. My attention pointed sharply at the changes happening, in the light, in the air, in the smell of the earth. There is no time like those first few days of a new season to awaken the senses and renew faith in the beauty of this life.The kettle seems to take just a bit longer to boil in the cooler kitchen and in those few extra moments I find my mind wandering to thoughts of cinnamon scented breads, oven roasted pumpkin and pots of soup on the stove. My closet and spice cabinet are inevitably rotated, those summer things, those summery flavors moving to the back in favor of the warmth of sweaters and cardamom pods.  Though our garden is waning I know there will be lots of lovely things at the farmers market soon and I’m looking forward to the new seasons produce. Nothing quite captivates me or captures the essence of the season here in New England, quite like apples. I unabashedly devour them in everything – soups, salads, roasted, raw, sweet, savory. I fairly live for that first bite into the first apple of the autumn season. Of course that’s first bite is even better on a slightly crisp, sweater needed, sunny, orangish leafy sort of day. Below is the recipe for a lovely rustic galette – just the sort of thing I find myself wanting to make when that unavoidable pull of the universe calls for baking.I like to use a mix of apples for this galette , skins on, textures and flavors all melding together. I also shy away from store-bought in favor of more local, older school varieties of apples. I find the flavors richer and the textures more diversified. Check out the local farmers markets or farm stands – I like Macs, Macoun, Cortland and Cox.

Apple Galette

350 for 55-60 min

Crust (adapted from the brilliant Linda Lomelino

  • 1 2/3 Cups or 200g flour
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2/3 Cup or 150g very cold butter
  • 1 tsp fresh ground cardamom
  • 4-5 Tbsp ice water

 

Filling

  • 4 medium sized / 725 g mixed apples 
  • ¼ cup or 35g golden raisins
  • Zest ½ orange & ½ lemon
  • Juice of half an orange, 3Tbsp
  • Juice half a lemon, 1Tbsp
  • 1Tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 Tbsp heavy cream or milk (to wash the edges of the crust)
  • plus more granular sugar for topping

instructions:

to make the crust – mix flour, sugar, salt and cardamom together in a large bowl. Begin with very cold butter and finely dice butter with a knife or finely slice with a cheese slicer (a trick i learned from Linda Lomelino)

gently rub butter with clean hands into the dry mixture until it is combined and resembles the texture of wet sand. Some larger pea sized pieces of butter are ok.

Slowly add the iced water, one tablespoon at a time, until the dough just comes together to form a ball. Pat into a disc and wrap in wax paper and a clean kitchen towel. place in the refrigerator to chill at least 30 minutes or up to 24 hours

To make the Galette – Preheat the oven to 350

slice apples into 1/8″ thick slices, cores removed and skins on. Then toss the apple slices with the zest, juice, cinnamon, sugar and raisins.

remove dough from refrigerator and let stand a few minutes or until its easily rolled out but not warm. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough until its about 13″ in diameter. Carefully transfer to a parchment lined 9″ pie pan or baking sheet.

add the apple mixture on top of the dough (arrange in a fan pattern if desired, or simply pile it on) leaving about 2 1/2″ from the edge with no filling.

carefully fold up the edge all the way around and press a little to seal. Brush on the milk or cream across the top of the folded edge and sprinkle generously with granulated sugar. this will help the edges brown nicely

Pop the galette into the oven and bake 55 – 60 minutes our until the crust is cooked. You may need to cover the center apples with a bit of extra baking parchment if the edges begin to catch.

Remove from the oven and let stand about 10 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature

setting a holiday table & giveaway with Farmhouse Pottery

November 30, 2017

I’ve collaborated with Farmhouse Pottery for a giveaway to celebrate the start of the festive season and all those rituals, traditions and celebrations that go along with it. These last few years have marked the inception of yearly traditions of my own. With more than one holiday spent away from New England and extended family, I have had the occasion to distill down what it is I love most about the traditions I have been celebrating nearly all my life. It is no surprise that food and the preparation of a few particular family recipes are at the core of those things I hold dear. Both preparing and sitting down at the table with them marks the passage of another year – of both growth and change but also constants and a certain steadfastness. This time away has been a chance to incorporate those things I love most about celebrating and those which have made the days feel most festive to me.While New England is the provenance of my design sensibilities, I have taken bits and pieces, collecting them as I go, from everywhere I have lived and traveled. Ideas and inspirations for colors, textures, celebratory dishes and sensibilities. My appreciation for design has developed into a deep love of paring the old with the new in an organic and authentic way. I love the welcoming and satisfying look it creates, and the points of interest and discovery that naturally follow for those who interact with the design.

The first holiday I ever spent away from New England was with my now-husband & youngest brother. Just the three of us. And while we didn’t really have an agenda for the day, other than to relax on our one day away from work, I knew I wanted there to be a beautiful table. This idea of the table has become central in the creation of my own yearly traditions.  It relish the creation and setting of the table each holiday – it has become something of a ritual right of the holiday in my festive celebrations. I was working full-time as a florist then and so spent the better part of a week combing the flower market, in addition to my regular client shopping, looking for just the right greens and peachy golden hued china mums go with the topaz & platinum flame stitch linen I had chosen from a rental company for our dinner. To this day, I still love the way that table turned out , but more importantly I love the memory of the three of us gathered around it in the kitchen of our tiny San Francisco apartment on Christmas Day chatting, eating and laughing so hard our bellies ached. When it comes to design and decor (and really every aspect of my life) I prefer to let the architecture of space and the quality of a few simple pieces be at the center of the design conversation. I find it helps create a calm welcoming environment, especially around the chaos of holidays. I apply this paired back approach to everything from wardrobe to decor to interiors to table design. I have such an affinity for how striking one strong concept or visual statement can be. Over the summer I had the opportunity to visit the lovely folks at Farmhouse Pottery and a chance to see the charming new Woodland Forrest collection; stunningly simple, with sculptural modern lines but all the heritage charm of handmade pieces. I was completely smitten – individually each tree is unique, as only a handmade object can be and I adore that beautifully organic quality they, quite literally, bring to the table. Completely inspired, I started imagining the desing for a beautiful winter table right then and there on the floor of the Farmhouse Pottery studio way back in July.  Once I knew that I wanted to build a design around the Woodland Trees, I next chose the linens. Remembering that table all those years ago in San Francisco, I  picked a patterned cloth,  and neutral charcoal blue napkin. For all the complexity of the tablecloth, I still wanted the table to feel simple and balanced. I chose the pattern because I thought it was reminiscent of those bone-chilling swirling snowy New England winter nights and would look elegant next to the fire for our intimate dinner in the library. Using heritage flatware and plates I added just a sprig of seeded eucalyptus and two splendidly long tape candles into the mix. I especially love the subtle visual contrasts of the different trees and they way the ridges capture and reflect the candlelight. I have a particular fondness for balsam woodland trees and their strong architectural detail and love the strong lines they create. Instead of using flowers of greens, I added subtle texture and a bit of visual contrast with the addition of the wooden carved trees – they are great visual structure for the table. 

These beautifully crafted Farmhouse Pottery Woodland Trees are certain to feature prominently in the making my own modern heritage and traditions for years to come. This Giveaway is now closed. Congratulations to the winner Kelliann Arakawa 

Giveaway details : You have the chance to win a Farmhouse Pottery gift bag containing Balsam ceramic and Evergreen wooden Trees – 5 pieces combined! To enter: Just comment on today’s Instagram post  telling us your favorite festive tradition. Open to U.S. residents only. Ends 12/14/17. Winner will receive his or her gift bag within two weeks of the giveaway closing date.   

this post is sponsored by Farmhouse Pottery. All opinion are my own. 

A holiday meal : futsu squash soup, braised lentils with roasted root vegetables & crumb topping apple tart

November 20, 2017

I love Thanksgiving and I will readily admit that I love it for one sole reason. That reason is this, it is an excuse to break the rigidity of routine, to step outside the confines of our everydayness and shirk gleefully those habits we practice, mostly out of necessity and for the sake of efficiency, every other day of the year. It is an excuse to make those familiar routines take a back seat – if only for one day and only for one meal. At its core, Thanksgiving is the simplest of holidays – no strings attached, no pressure around gifts or the like. It is a day reserved simply to step outside the familiar and celebrate the everydayness of the everyday : one table, one meal and perhaps a few (or many) guests to share it with however and with whatever food feels the most appropriate in that moment. And the meal can be one as complex or elementary as one chooses and need not conform to any rules or practices (other than the fact that I do very much like to think about those things I am grateful for and thankful for and practice kindness – but ideally that is everyday not just one)  -so for the love and poetry of food and gatherings, we celebrate Thanksgiving. continue reading

2017 Rhode Island Photography Workshop

December 8, 2016

Join us in Paradise! A three-day photography and styling workshop in Paradise Valley, Rhode Island with Betty Liu and me!

This January (20th – 22nd) we will call a beautiful  home. With sweeping ocean views and picturesque fields as our background we will nurture the creative spirit and delve into the photographic and creative process.

Tucked away in the beautifully updated Paradise Farmhouse at Norman Bird Sanctuary, we will exploring the art (and mechanics!) of photography and styling. You will learn how to and create, shoot & style food and still life scenes. We will discuss the use of natural light, camera mechanics, prop selection and scene creation continue reading

two summery sips cocktails & a masonshaker giveaway

July 22, 2016

masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-8masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-9masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-6 masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-5 I can envision dappled sunlight filtering down through the leaves of the apples. Their branches bowing under the weight of a thousands of young bright green fruit. There is a table under these branches and pitchers of water are dotted along its length, catching the light and throwing it in large angular patterns across the surface. An easy-going Sunday sort of music can be heard and people are wandering about the garden nibbling on various crostini, cheeses and fruit. Some have cocktails in hand as the stoop to admire a flower or reach toward one another in greeting.

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Boston Photography Immersion Class

June 1, 2016

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Workshop with guest teacher Betty Liu

Thursday, June 23rd + Friday, June 24th 2016

Dinner | Loyal Nine Restaurant, East Cambridge MA

Workshop | Warehouse XI, Union Square Somerville MA

Time | 6:30-9:30pm Thursday & 8:30am – 5pm Friday

Price | SOLD OUT
Belkin Lookout Farm Edible Boston-18MV WORKSHOP -62I’m so excited to be hosting my first event here on the ground in Boston and I couldn’t think of a lovelier or more talented photographer to join me as a guest teacher than Betty Liu

Betty is not only a masterly photographer but an inspired cook with a gorgeous food blog and incredible command of flavours and ingredients. I am always inspired by her kitchen wizardrycottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-255Together, Krissy & Betty will help you to learn camera basics and the process of photography including, how to use natural light, incorporating the human element and setting up a shot.

Please join us on Thursday 23 June for a dinner at Loyal Nine, one of the nation’s most creative and innovative new restaurants. Here we will enjoy offerings from their seasonally inspired colonialist revival menu and get to know one another. There will be a bit of a discussion over dinner on discovering inspirations and social media but mostly we can just kick back get to know new friends, enjoying good food and the conviviality of the table.  

The following day, Friday 24 June will be spent at WarehouseXI making images through hands on instruction. Our day will start with a light breakfast where we will dive right into shooting! Betty & Krissy will begin with a discussion on how to use a camera and will share their knowledge, experience and understanding of photography & the creative process. You will learn how to create and shoot still life scenes, how to use natural light, camera mechanics, prop selection and scene creation. Gathering again at the lunch table, we will have time to consider the mornings teachings and engage in a Q&A session. In the afternoon we will roll off into small groups so that you may set-up a scene to shoot yourself; building upon the morning’s lessons with guidance from Krissy & Betty.

In addition, you will also have an opportunity to shoot a live scenes and learn to capture movement during our cocktail making demonstration. A guest bartender will be creating something special just for us! And mixing it up on the day – a great opportunity to capture process in action.

Equipment needed | DSLR camera with manual setting options, Lens or lenses, Batteries and charger, Notebook

Please contact Krissy @ krissyoshea@gmail.com to reserve your spot 

*Please know that due to nature of the event, payment must be made in full at the time of registration and can not be refunded. Price of the ticket includes all dinner, breakfast and lunch costs and a cocktail.Zucchini Lemon Cake _ bettysliu-4

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fiddle head and dill weed omelette

May 17, 2016

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fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-5fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-11I still remember where I was, the meal I was having when I first came across fiddlehead ferns. In the tiny raw-wood panelled dining room of Kitchen Table Bistro in Vermont on one of those balmy spring evenings, just as it is now sitting at my desk writing this. The windows were opened, just a crack, and the new season breeze gently puffed at the beeswax candles on the tables. I watched as candlelight flickered over the wine blushed cheeks of the other guests. We ordered a bottle of sweet minerally white which was on our table sweating slightly in the warmth of the dining room – little beads of water running to the bottom of the bottle and pooling in a damp ring on the tablecloth.  We sat and sipped, drinking it all in – the wine, the atmosphere; all of it.

And out came a taste from the kitchen; a tiny homemade brioche toasts with spring pea pure and the most delicate slice of house smoked trout caught from the river further down the road. I remember loving the buttery richness of the toast and the way the smoke from the trout stayed on my tongue until I washed it down with a cool sip of wine. fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-7fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-9

We had asked the server to bring us what he thought was the nicest of the first courses that evening.  Each choice had sounded as wonderful as the next and we were indecisive and caught up in the romance of the evening, too giddy to make the decision ourselves. A perfectly elegant plate of fritto misto arrived. Not a mound of fried things but rather an incredible considered plate of fine spring vegetables accented by a verdant herb sauce strategically painted in swaths on the plate. There were flowers too, bright yellow and purple, sprinkled about the vegetables and they looked beautiful against the green. And so we began to sip again on our minerally wine and nibble at the vegetables wrapped in golden lighter than air batter. So light in fact that instead of weighing down the tiny spring parsnip, mushroom or ramp it somehow brought out the succulent flavor of each. And on that plate were also a few perfect fiddle heads – tasting of fresh spring earth, bright and citrus like asparagus but deeply earthy like spinach. I was elated and intrigued having tasted something I hadn’t known before and queried the server about them. He graciously gave me the explanation of their origins, young unfurled fern fronds foraged from the Vermont woods. His own affection for these rather unusual spring vegetables pronounced in his wide grin and excited tone. Since this meal I often though of our server that night as I too excitedly awaited the arrival of fiddleheads each spring. They have become something of a harbinger of spring and feel like a great reward after winter’s limited produce. I regularly find myself overcome with a feeling of elation and excitement when standing in front of a stall at the farmers market and seeing fiddleheads for the first time in spring.fiddle head ferns.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-4

The key to this recipe is to use the freshest and most delicious ingredients possible. As with all simple things, it is the quality which makes this humble omelet extraordinary. Try and find the freshest eggs and the most plump green fiddleheads you can. Of course this omelet is wonderful for breakfast but I think of it more as a meal or lunch or dinner. It is especially lovely served with a simple mescaline salad and a cold glass of white wine.

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Root Vegetable Chowder

November 14, 2014

This simple bowl of chowder is full of  deeply earthy, satisfying flavors  – it craves a brisk walk in the steely sunshine and a thick cut slice of dark brown bread. 



Chowder is something which feels synonymous with my New England roots. The ubiquitous clam chowder is ingrained in the food culture of the region as much as fish & chips are here in London. I grew up eating simple corn chowder and on other occasions a more robust oyster chowder. I like that they are quick to make and can usually be made with things already in the larder – the staples – butter, milk, water, potatoes. 



The origins for this chowder came on a walk through Richmond Park. I can understand why King Henry VIII used it as his hunting grounds- so beautiful & so varied in such proximity to the city. After an earnest walk, I wanted something delicious but unfussy. I used what I had around for this root vegetable chowder. One of which was a large amount of whey left over after making cheese the day before. Instead of dumping the protein rich whey, I used it as the stock base for this chowder. Water or a light stock work equally well. 




Serves a group (4-8 depending on serving size)


1 1/2 pounds parsnips
1 1/2 pounds turnips (or swedes as they are known here)
2 sm/medium sized potatoes 
1 large yellow onion. chopped. 
3 springs of thyme
1 bay leaf
3/4 tsp garam masala 
4 cups whey, water or light stock
2 cups milk (whole recommended) 
knob of ghee or butter
sea salt & fresh black pepper




Melt ghee in the pan and when it starts to bubble add the chopped onion, thyme and a pinch of sea salt. 
Sweat the onions until they are translucent. Stir in the garam masala, toast until fragrant, then add the bay leaf and thyme. Stir everything together then add the washed and chopped parsnips, potatoes & turnip. It is up to you if you would like to peel them or not. I usually don’t. Just make sure to use a turnip that is unwaxed, otherwise it should be peeled.  
Stir veg together until it is well coated in the ghee & spices. Let it cook for a few minutes more to blend all the flavors together. 
Add your stock liquid, which ever you are using and a dash of salt. Bring it to a boil and reduce heat. Simmer for about 25 minutes or until turnips, parsnips and potatoes are very soft. 
Liquid should have reduce down quite a bit. 
Once the vegetables are done, remove pan from the heat and let it cool a few minutes. Using your preferred method, blend into a smooth but still quite textured mixture. 
Return pan to a low heat and slowly add in the milk. You may need to add a little more milk depending on your preference. Heat milk through but do not scald or boil it.  


Salt & pepper to taste. 

optional – I serve each of the bowls topped with toasted leeks, a drizzle of herb oil and a few dried cranberries. 



New England Summer

July 9, 2010

Im feeling inspired by my time spent on the rocky maine coast already this summer and by the fact that i wake up to beautiful blue grey fog every morning here in san francisco


i made a treasury! thought i would share. hope you enjoy all these gorgeous etsy stores.