Tag Archives: cottagefarm

APPLE GALETTE WITH CARDAMOM CRUST

October 19, 2018

I love greeting the first few chilly mornings of autumn and can usually be found, shoulders wrapped, sitting in the kitchen alone with the steely blue light, hands clasped around a mug of tea. These moments of transition are always my most favorite. My attention pointed sharply at the changes happening, in the light, in the air, in the smell of the earth. There is no time like those first few days of a new season to awaken the senses and renew faith in the beauty of this life.The kettle seems to take just a bit longer to boil in the cooler kitchen and in those few extra moments I find my mind wandering to thoughts of cinnamon scented breads, oven roasted pumpkin and pots of soup on the stove. My closet and spice cabinet are inevitably rotated, those summer things, those summery flavors moving to the back in favor of the warmth of sweaters and cardamom pods.  Though our garden is waning I know there will be lots of lovely things at the farmers market soon and I’m looking forward to the new seasons produce. Nothing quite captivates me or captures the essence of the season here in New England, quite like apples. I unabashedly devour them in everything – soups, salads, roasted, raw, sweet, savory. I fairly live for that first bite into the first apple of the autumn season. Of course that’s first bite is even better on a slightly crisp, sweater needed, sunny, orangish leafy sort of day. Below is the recipe for a lovely rustic galette – just the sort of thing I find myself wanting to make when that unavoidable pull of the universe calls for baking.I like to use a mix of apples for this galette , skins on, textures and flavors all melding together. I also shy away from store-bought in favor of more local, older school varieties of apples. I find the flavors richer and the textures more diversified. Check out the local farmers markets or farm stands – I like Macs, Macoun, Cortland and Cox.

Apple Galette

350 for 55-60 min

Crust (adapted from the brilliant Linda Lomelino

  • 1 2/3 Cups or 200g flour
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2/3 Cup or 150g very cold butter
  • 1 tsp fresh ground cardamom
  • 4-5 Tbsp ice water

 

Filling

  • 4 medium sized / 725 g mixed apples 
  • ¼ cup or 35g golden raisins
  • Zest ½ orange & ½ lemon
  • Juice of half an orange, 3Tbsp
  • Juice half a lemon, 1Tbsp
  • 1Tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 Tbsp heavy cream or milk (to wash the edges of the crust)
  • plus more granular sugar for topping

instructions:

to make the crust – mix flour, sugar, salt and cardamom together in a large bowl. Begin with very cold butter and finely dice butter with a knife or finely slice with a cheese slicer (a trick i learned from Linda Lomelino)

gently rub butter with clean hands into the dry mixture until it is combined and resembles the texture of wet sand. Some larger pea sized pieces of butter are ok.

Slowly add the iced water, one tablespoon at a time, until the dough just comes together to form a ball. Pat into a disc and wrap in wax paper and a clean kitchen towel. place in the refrigerator to chill at least 30 minutes or up to 24 hours

To make the Galette – Preheat the oven to 350

slice apples into 1/8″ thick slices, cores removed and skins on. Then toss the apple slices with the zest, juice, cinnamon, sugar and raisins.

remove dough from refrigerator and let stand a few minutes or until its easily rolled out but not warm. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough until its about 13″ in diameter. Carefully transfer to a parchment lined 9″ pie pan or baking sheet.

add the apple mixture on top of the dough (arrange in a fan pattern if desired, or simply pile it on) leaving about 2 1/2″ from the edge with no filling.

carefully fold up the edge all the way around and press a little to seal. Brush on the milk or cream across the top of the folded edge and sprinkle generously with granulated sugar. this will help the edges brown nicely

Pop the galette into the oven and bake 55 – 60 minutes our until the crust is cooked. You may need to cover the center apples with a bit of extra baking parchment if the edges begin to catch.

Remove from the oven and let stand about 10 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature

setting a holiday table & giveaway with Farmhouse Pottery

November 30, 2017

I’ve collaborated with Farmhouse Pottery for a giveaway to celebrate the start of the festive season and all those rituals, traditions and celebrations that go along with it. These last few years have marked the inception of yearly traditions of my own. With more than one holiday spent away from New England and extended family, I have had the occasion to distill down what it is I love most about the traditions I have been celebrating nearly all my life. It is no surprise that food and the preparation of a few particular family recipes are at the core of those things I hold dear. Both preparing and sitting down at the table with them marks the passage of another year – of both growth and change but also constants and a certain steadfastness. This time away has been a chance to incorporate those things I love most about celebrating and those which have made the days feel most festive to me.While New England is the provenance of my design sensibilities, I have taken bits and pieces, collecting them as I go, from everywhere I have lived and traveled. Ideas and inspirations for colors, textures, celebratory dishes and sensibilities. My appreciation for design has developed into a deep love of paring the old with the new in an organic and authentic way. I love the welcoming and satisfying look it creates, and the points of interest and discovery that naturally follow for those who interact with the design.

The first holiday I ever spent away from New England was with my now-husband & youngest brother. Just the three of us. And while we didn’t really have an agenda for the day, other than to relax on our one day away from work, I knew I wanted there to be a beautiful table. This idea of the table has become central in the creation of my own yearly traditions.  It relish the creation and setting of the table each holiday – it has become something of a ritual right of the holiday in my festive celebrations. I was working full-time as a florist then and so spent the better part of a week combing the flower market, in addition to my regular client shopping, looking for just the right greens and peachy golden hued china mums go with the topaz & platinum flame stitch linen I had chosen from a rental company for our dinner. To this day, I still love the way that table turned out , but more importantly I love the memory of the three of us gathered around it in the kitchen of our tiny San Francisco apartment on Christmas Day chatting, eating and laughing so hard our bellies ached. When it comes to design and decor (and really every aspect of my life) I prefer to let the architecture of space and the quality of a few simple pieces be at the center of the design conversation. I find it helps create a calm welcoming environment, especially around the chaos of holidays. I apply this paired back approach to everything from wardrobe to decor to interiors to table design. I have such an affinity for how striking one strong concept or visual statement can be. Over the summer I had the opportunity to visit the lovely folks at Farmhouse Pottery and a chance to see the charming new Woodland Forrest collection; stunningly simple, with sculptural modern lines but all the heritage charm of handmade pieces. I was completely smitten – individually each tree is unique, as only a handmade object can be and I adore that beautifully organic quality they, quite literally, bring to the table. Completely inspired, I started imagining the desing for a beautiful winter table right then and there on the floor of the Farmhouse Pottery studio way back in July.  Once I knew that I wanted to build a design around the Woodland Trees, I next chose the linens. Remembering that table all those years ago in San Francisco, I  picked a patterned cloth,  and neutral charcoal blue napkin. For all the complexity of the tablecloth, I still wanted the table to feel simple and balanced. I chose the pattern because I thought it was reminiscent of those bone-chilling swirling snowy New England winter nights and would look elegant next to the fire for our intimate dinner in the library. Using heritage flatware and plates I added just a sprig of seeded eucalyptus and two splendidly long tape candles into the mix. I especially love the subtle visual contrasts of the different trees and they way the ridges capture and reflect the candlelight. I have a particular fondness for balsam woodland trees and their strong architectural detail and love the strong lines they create. Instead of using flowers of greens, I added subtle texture and a bit of visual contrast with the addition of the wooden carved trees – they are great visual structure for the table. 

These beautifully crafted Farmhouse Pottery Woodland Trees are certain to feature prominently in the making my own modern heritage and traditions for years to come. This Giveaway is now closed. Congratulations to the winner Kelliann Arakawa 

Giveaway details : You have the chance to win a Farmhouse Pottery gift bag containing Balsam ceramic and Evergreen wooden Trees – 5 pieces combined! To enter: Just comment on today’s Instagram post  telling us your favorite festive tradition. Open to U.S. residents only. Ends 12/14/17. Winner will receive his or her gift bag within two weeks of the giveaway closing date.   

this post is sponsored by Farmhouse Pottery. All opinion are my own. 

a thanksgiving meal: wild rice stuffed pumpkins, a kale salad & almond apple cake

November 19, 2016

cottagefarmthanksgiving-krissyosheaphotography-2016-14Setting the table, is one of those rituals I cherish.  As a child I was tasked with collecting the flatware, polishing and carefully laying each piece beside the plate, in its designated place. Now, it has become a part of the process of eating together, whether it’s a weeknight, dinner party or holiday, that I love deeply. It has become something of a meditation, a pause at the end of the day (though some days a much more hasty pause than others) when the rhythm of everyday life takes over and I know exactly where I’m meant to be and what I’m meant to be doing.  And it is a routine which, unlike many others, has the ability to nearly effortlessly expand, or adapt to the moment. What is most weeknights two place settings at the table easily accommodates more weekend or holiday settings, and I find myself happily making room, shuffling about, sitting elbow to elbow.

I have shared many tables over the years, with family, close friends, new friends, and total strangers. Each meal has been uniquely its own, with some more memorable than others but each one creating and then possessing a certain magic all its own. Ephemeral, perhaps even sublimely theatrical.   cottagefarmthanksgiving-krissyosheaphotography-2016-2

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cottagefarmthanksgiving-krissyosheaphotography-2016-5 walking the fields I’ve found myself collecting and pocketing little bits of things – subconsciously brainstorming the thanksgiving table – the shiny side of chestnut leaves, dried pods from flowers gone by, a few gourds left from october. Pieces of fruit which will become part of dessert later in the night, sage which is still wonderfully abundant in the garden, pale gold maple leaves. I have been amassing a color palette in my head, a stack of miss matched dish linens could act as napkins and a collection of glasses sitting on the counter to dry become an unexpected grouping. All of these bits individually unremarkable but collected, something different all together. This is the essence of the table too. cottagefarmthanksgiving-krissyosheaphotography-2016-11

Below are a few recipes which make a meal. To me they are the quintessential flavors of autumn; of new england. Thought hopefully presented in a newish sort of way. They hold in their flavors, ingredients, indeed their very make up, same sense of place that the smell of apple wood smoke winding up from a chimney on a cold autumnal conjures in my mind. They are about the ingredients available and abundant at this moment and few spices borrowed from other places to make this meal a little more remarkable, a little more festive.

The little sugar pumpkins take on a gorgeous starch richness when baked and stuffed with the beautiful long grain black rice they are visually just as appealing. They carve nicely, and can be served in thick slices mounded with the fruit, nut and herb laden rice. The rice naturally has an aroma of summer hay and when cooked it reveals an intense nuttiness and gorgeous texture.  Save the seeds from the pumpkin and roast them up for perfect snack with a glass of wine or for munching during a football game – they are delicious.

The kale salad is simple but continues the play of sweet and savory so well accommodated by autumn. Pears are still sweet and juicy this time of year and the ruby-red jewels of the pomegranate seeds elevate this otherwise simplistic salad. A mustard dressing ties it all together.

And the almond cake, inspired by one I had in Portugal and adapted from a Nigella Lawson recipe is dense and stick to the roof of your mouth good. Caramelized apples, hints of cardamom and cinnamon, It’s a cake to make you linger at the table –

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For the Wild Rice Stuffed Pumpkins

serves 12

  • 3 small sugar pumpkins (aprox 2lbs each)
  • 2 cups / 400g long grain wild rice
  • 2 cups / 250g toasted pecans
  • 1 cup / 165g yellow raisins
  • 1 cup / 135g tart unsweetened dried cherries
  • zest from three large oranges
  • 2/3 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1 1/2 cups mint loose packed then chopped
  • 8 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup good quality olive oil
  • 3 tsp corse salt + a few more pinches for the pumpkin cavities
  • freshly ground black pepper
  1. rinse rice in cold water and soak overnight
  2. rinse and drain the rice again, add it to a large pot with enough water to cover the rice by an inch
  3. bring the pot to a boil, reduce heat and simmer rice for 30 minutes. Drain off any liquid that remains and set the rice aside to cool
  4. toast pecans in a 400 degree oven until lightly browned, being careful not to burn. remove from the oven and once cool enough to handle, roughly chop. then set aside
  5. in a large bowl, mix together the remaining ingredients and let them stand while the rice cools
  6. with a large sharp knife, cut the top off the pumpkin, horizontally and about 3 inches below the stem. reserve and set aside
  7. using a spoon remove the seeds and stringy insides, hollowing out the pumpkin. then add a generous pinch of salt to each cavity
  8. when the rice has cooled (it doesn’t have to be cold and can be slightly above room temp) add it along with the pecans to the rest of the ingredients. Toss to combine all flavors and set aside for 45 mins
  9. Preheat the oven to 425
  10. divide the mixture evenly between the three pumpkins and stuff each cavity with the rice mixture. Replace the lid (wrapping any stems in foil so they don’t burn) and place in a shallow baking dish, along with 2 cups of water.
  11. Bake for 1 hour or until the skin of the pumpkin is easily pierced, blistered and browned. check the pan periodically to ensure there is a bit of water in the bottom
  12. remove pumpkins from the oven and serve immediately or at room temp. Slicing each pumpkin vertically into 4 large wedges and scooping rice on top

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For the Kale Salad

serves 12

  • 3 large bunches of lacino kale
  • 2/3 cup pomegranate seeds
  • 2 small firm green or bosc pears, cored and sliced into 1/4 slices
  • 2 tbsp raw apple cider vinegar
  • 1/3 cup good quality olive oil
  • 2 tbsp cranberry jelly (or red currant)
  • 3 tsp grainy mustard
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • fresh ground black pepper to taste
  1. wash and dry the kale, strip the woody spine from each leaf and discard, and tear into 4″ pieces
  2. add kale, salt and apple cider vinegar to a large bowl. Massage with clean hands until the leaves have broken down and softened, 2-3 minutes.
  3. add pear slices and pomegranate seeds
  4. in a small bowl whisk together the cranberry jelly, mustard and olive oil. If the mixture is a little thick add a splash of water and whisk until emulsified
  5. drizzled dressing (as desired, you may not want it all) over salad and toss well to combine

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For the Apple Cake

adapted from a recipe by Nigella Lawson

serves 12

for the puree

  • 3 large tart cooking apples
  • 1 tbsp juice lemon
  • 3 cinnamon sticks
  • 2 tsp sugar

for the carmelized apples

  • 1 extra-large or two large apples of your choice
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp finely ground green cardamom

for the cake

  • 8 large eggs at room temp
  • 325g almond flour
  • 275g sugar
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/8 tsp pure almond extract
  • pinch of salt
  1. for the puree  peel, core and roughly chop the three tart cooking apples. add to a small sauce pan along with the lemon juice, three cinnamon sticks and sugar
  2. bring the pan to a bubble over medium heat, then reduce, cover, and simmer over low heat, 15 minutes, stirring occasionally until the apples become very mushy or breakdown all together
  3. remove from heat and let cool to room temp. then discard cinnamon sticks. there should be a heaping cup of puree
  1. for the caramelized apples – peel core and slice apples into 1/2 slices
  2. melt butter in a large frying pan over medium high heat, once bubbling add the cardamom and stir constantly until fragrant
  3. add brown sugar and stir until dissolved
  4. then add the apples in a spiral starting from the outside of the pan so that the face of each slice has full contact with the pan. Cook 2- 3 minutes or until browned, turn and brown the other side.
  5. Remove from heat and allow to cool
  1. for the cake –  preheat the oven to 350
  2. lightly oil the inside of a 10″ spring form pan with a tasteless oil and cut a circle of parchment to fit in the bottom of the pan. dust the inside with almond flour
  3. separate the eggs. reserve whites in a large bowl, add yolks to food processor
  4. along with the egg yolk,add to the food processor the cooled puree almond flour, sugar, lemon juice, pinch of salt and almond extract
  5. arrange the caramelized apple slices in a single spiraled layer at the bottom of the spring form pan
  6. in a separate bowl beat the egg whites to soft peaks, its ok if the tops flop over a little. then, gently fold in the mixture from the food processor until well combined
  7. pour and scrape the mixture into the prepared pan, over the top of the apple slices and place in the oven immediately
  8. bake for 35 – 45min. checking after 35 for doneness
  9. remove from oven and place on a wire rack to cool. once cool, run a thin knife along the inside edge of the pan to ensure the cake is free before carefully removing the mold.
  10. Invert cake onto a plate or platter and dust with powered sugar. serve that daycottagefarmthanksgiving-krissyosheaphotography-2016-13cottagefarmthanksgiving-krissyosheaphotography-2016-12

two summery sips cocktails & a masonshaker giveaway

July 22, 2016

masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-8masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-9masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-6 masonshakergiveaway.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-5 I can envision dappled sunlight filtering down through the leaves of the apples. Their branches bowing under the weight of a thousands of young bright green fruit. There is a table under these branches and pitchers of water are dotted along its length, catching the light and throwing it in large angular patterns across the surface. An easy-going Sunday sort of music can be heard and people are wandering about the garden nibbling on various crostini, cheeses and fruit. Some have cocktails in hand as the stoop to admire a flower or reach toward one another in greeting.

continue reading

rye berry salad and an event recap

July 13, 2016

cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-7 Cooking for a crowd is something for which I have the very greatest affection; the menu planning, ingredient shopping, kitchen prep and especially, those last few moments before the meal begins and everyone is seated together at the table. I even love the clean up. Washing and putting away all the plates and flatware and large platters; I ones I only ever use when serving a crowd.

Unsurprisingly, the Wednesday before my recent Boston workshop which I hosted with guest teacher Betty Liu, in the midst of all the bustling and prepping, I felt that familiar infectious excited happiness I always feel before an event. I could feel it bubbling up as I was driving back to the farm, windows down and heady hay scented summer air rushing in and a load of beautiful Five Fork Farms blooms in tow. I began to feel intoxicated with happiness . In less than 24 hours, accompanied by two of the loveliest food bloggers I know, Betty & Valentina, I would be standing in my kitchen, cooking for a crowd. We were preparing a lunch which relied on fresh ingredients, prepared simply, and using as much gorgeous produce from my gardens at CottageFarm as possible. Our gardens at the farm have been producing at such a rapid rate it was wonderful to have an excuse to cook up a big meal to share! To showcase without overworking or overcomplicating things is always my desired method of preparation. I simply want the food to be at its best and freshest and for this to shine through.  continue reading

grilled radicchio with olives and anchovy over egg fettuccine

June 13, 2016

cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-59 Food, and gathering together at the table have an undeniable ability to create the greatest sense of comfort. Easy, unfussy food and a convivial attitude are the perfect catalysts to entice us to relax into the experience and linger at the table. When I dream of the perfect evening it is one full of the ebbs and flows of chatter and laugher over music, around a table laden with dishes and a distinctly unhurried feeling. Nothing brings me greater pleasure than seeing the table in the morning strewn with the odd dish or two and that new pair of taper candlesticks having all but burned away to tiny nubs.

The recipe below is one I have been making rather a lot lately, due in part to its ability to encourage a sense of comfort and invite us to linger at the table just a bit longer. The other reason for its successive appearance is that it includes moving the kitchen from the indoor ovens to the open fire of the outdoor grill. There is something about cooking over the open flame; it brings new flavor and possibility to ordinary foods. Grilling is also an excuse to stand outside, something I never miss to opportunity to do, with a glass of wine or the ubiquitous summer g & t in hand and enjoy the beauty of the season and the company of friends and family while you cook. It seems all the more social to cook on the grill, with people strolling up to chat and refresh drinks and take a turn maneuvering whatever is cooking over the flame. As the cook you can be in the center of the action as opposed to cordoned off away in the kitchen.

cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-56 cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-57 Finally I love this dish because it uses one of my favorite ingredients, radicchio. Grilling the radicchio, it’s as if it gives up its secret. Over the fire it transforms from a bitter stiff leaved chicory to something so much sweeter becoming supple and delicate . I am always amazed at how simply dressing it with a bit of salt and pepper and olive oil is so transformative when coupled with the grill. Even without pasta , the radicchio is worth making. It is lovely over a garlic white bean puree, or mixed in with simple greens for added texture. Its sweet smoky flavour also lend well to being smothered in chopped egg and drizzle with a bit of dressing and capers. I just love grilling up large deep red quarters of radicchio and watching as they turn to a beautiful deep plummy caramel.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-60

Use a fresh egg pasta. Cook it until it is only just tender, you want it to retain its toothsomeness.  Coupled with the tender smoky sweet radicchio and the richness from the olives and the brine from the anchovy this dish comes together in a way that is so satisfying I can only name it as true comfort food.

A little note on the olives and anchovies – if possible try to get cured olives rather than brined. they will be dark and wrinkly, not the prettiest, but their flavor is deep and dark and wont compete with the salt or brine of the anchovy. For the anchovy, I use the white fillets – they are brined rather than salt packed and have a fresh bright taste and do not require the same prep as the salt packed. I also love a tangy slice or two over a piece of baguette.

Egg fettuccine with Grilled Radicchio

serves 2

  • 1/2lb or 250g fresh egg fettuccine
  • 1 medium head of radicchio
  • 3 white anchovies  (brine preferably)
  • 1 Tsp chopped fresh rosemary
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 cup reserved pasta water
  • zest 1/2 lemon
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 Tbsp fresh chopped chives
  • 1/2 cup cured black olives
  • salt and pepper

Remove the outer leaves of the radicchio and trim the stem end. then cut the radicchio in half along the vertical and agin into quarters. you want to ensure that you have cut each wedge with a bit of the stem still on so that they hold together on the grill. Coat in olive oil then sprinkle them with salt and pepper. Place on the grill and turn every few minutes until sides are beautifully charred and the radicchio is tender. aprox 6-8 minutes. Let stand until you are ready to serve

Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil add 2-3 Tbsp salt and return to a boil

In a small saute pan warm 3 Tbsp olive oil and add the smashed garlic cloves stir until fragrant. Then add the chopped fresh rosemary and saute again until fragrant. Then add the anchovy filets and saute until slightly crisp, breaking them up with the back of a wooden spoon as you go. Remove from heat and discard garlic cloves. Then stir in the parsley and lemon zest. Let it stand-off the heat while you make the pasta.

Add your fettuccine to the boiling water. Stir and test after 1 minute for doneness. Depending upon the freshness of your pasta, it may take anywhere from 1 -5 minutes to cook. Be careful not to over cook. Reserve 1/2 cup of the cooking water and drain the pasta.

Then add it to the saute pan with the anchovy mixture, toss well to coat. If needed add a little of the cooking water, bit by bit, until the noodles are coated well and evenly in the mixture. Then stir through the olives and plate the pasta. Add grilled radicchio quarters to each plat and sprinkle with fresh chives and a good crack of fresh black pepper cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2016-58

 

Boston Photography Immersion Class

June 1, 2016

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Workshop with guest teacher Betty Liu

Thursday, June 23rd + Friday, June 24th 2016

Dinner | Loyal Nine Restaurant, East Cambridge MA

Workshop | Warehouse XI, Union Square Somerville MA

Time | 6:30-9:30pm Thursday & 8:30am – 5pm Friday

Price | SOLD OUT
Belkin Lookout Farm Edible Boston-18MV WORKSHOP -62I’m so excited to be hosting my first event here on the ground in Boston and I couldn’t think of a lovelier or more talented photographer to join me as a guest teacher than Betty Liu

Betty is not only a masterly photographer but an inspired cook with a gorgeous food blog and incredible command of flavours and ingredients. I am always inspired by her kitchen wizardrycottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-255Together, Krissy & Betty will help you to learn camera basics and the process of photography including, how to use natural light, incorporating the human element and setting up a shot.

Please join us on Thursday 23 June for a dinner at Loyal Nine, one of the nation’s most creative and innovative new restaurants. Here we will enjoy offerings from their seasonally inspired colonialist revival menu and get to know one another. There will be a bit of a discussion over dinner on discovering inspirations and social media but mostly we can just kick back get to know new friends, enjoying good food and the conviviality of the table.  

The following day, Friday 24 June will be spent at WarehouseXI making images through hands on instruction. Our day will start with a light breakfast where we will dive right into shooting! Betty & Krissy will begin with a discussion on how to use a camera and will share their knowledge, experience and understanding of photography & the creative process. You will learn how to create and shoot still life scenes, how to use natural light, camera mechanics, prop selection and scene creation. Gathering again at the lunch table, we will have time to consider the mornings teachings and engage in a Q&A session. In the afternoon we will roll off into small groups so that you may set-up a scene to shoot yourself; building upon the morning’s lessons with guidance from Krissy & Betty.

In addition, you will also have an opportunity to shoot a live scenes and learn to capture movement during our cocktail making demonstration. A guest bartender will be creating something special just for us! And mixing it up on the day – a great opportunity to capture process in action.

Equipment needed | DSLR camera with manual setting options, Lens or lenses, Batteries and charger, Notebook

Please contact Krissy @ krissyoshea@gmail.com to reserve your spot 

*Please know that due to nature of the event, payment must be made in full at the time of registration and can not be refunded. Price of the ticket includes all dinner, breakfast and lunch costs and a cocktail.Zucchini Lemon Cake _ bettysliu-4

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Pistachio Granola with Poached Pears

May 3, 2016

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I noticed this morning that the dogwood has flowered. Tiny dark, muddy pink flowers, more hull than petal. And in another week or so the tree will be a swath of most delicate light pink across a greening background. The lilac is starting too. A few more warm afternoons and they should be ready for cutting. I cant wait to fill the house with vessels full. I am caught up in the tactile world of spring. Each day the landscape shifts perceptibly before me as leaves burst forth and flowers spring open. One day seems to bleed into the next with no clear end or beginning. Just a continuous unfurling the days vacillating between blissfully warmth and raw wetness and nights which are still decidedly cool, cold even.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-11cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-7cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-9But, gone is the fierceness of winter. The tempestuous winds have died away and the acuminous cold no longer strikes you when you step outside. On morning walks over the fields and through city streets alike, it is still chilly. The dark coldness of night having settled in the wee hours and continuing to lingers into the mornings. Admittedly thought this hasn’t stopped me from opening the windows before going to bed. There is something peaceful about drifting off to sleep wrapped up in heavy layers of blankets with the cold on my cheeks and a symphony of peepers call out over the night. It is something I relish with childlike delight.

In the mornings  I make my way to the kitchen wrapped in woolen jumper, toes tucked warmly into slippers. I fill the kettle and place it on the stove, light the burner, watching as its great blue flame leaps up against the shivery morning. I often wrap myself in an additional shawl while waiting for the kettle, knowing these layers will be shed before afternoons arrival. But still, the added layers and warmth of hot tea are a necessity. So to is a warming breakfast. But, it feels to late in the season for hearty bowls of squash porridge and to early for light sweet fruit. Not that any is readily available just yet anyway.

I often eat a bowl of miso soup for breakfast this time of year. I love its earthy salty broth and the addition of a few cubes are tofu make for a wholesome beginning. But there are days I crave something  equally as satisfying with a bit less broth and a little hint of sweet. For those days, I have been making up big batches of pistachio granola and topping it with spicy poached pears.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-2cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography2016-3Alone, or with a dollop of thick natural yogurt beneath, this breakfast seems to straddle the gap of cold mornings and warmer days just perfectly. The granola gets a richness from the olive oil and the most delightful crunchy clusters form around the pistachios as it bakes. The baking of the oats and honey have a magic of their own. They perfume the mornings wrapping the house in a kind of warm spell and chasing away the last of the nights chill.

Pistachio Granola with Honey Poached Pears

for the granola

  • 1 cup oats
  • 1/2 cups oat bran
  • 1/3 raw shelled pistachios
  • 1/4 hemp seeds
  • 1/4 sesame seeds
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp sweet extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 tsp garam marsala
  • 1/4 tsp freshly grated cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • pinch of salt
  1. preheat oven to 410 degrees
  2. spread all the dry ingredients on a large parchment lined baking sheet.
  3. Drizzled with the honey and olive oil and toss well to combine
  4. spread in a thin even covering on the baking sheet and bake for 10/12 minutes or until golden – being carefull not to burn.
  5. remove from the oven and let it cool so the granola becomes crunchy

for the pears

  • 1 bosc pear- pealed, cored and cut in half
  • 2 cup water
  • 1/2 tsp whole cloves
  • 1/4 tsp fennel seeds
  • 1.5 tbs honey
  1. add spices, honey and water to a small sauce pan
  2. bring liquid to a boil
  3. drop in pear halves, reduce to rapid simmer, cover & cook about 15 min or until pears are tender.
  4. at this point remove the pears –  continue to reduce the poaching liquid until it becomes a syrup like consistency if desired or simply discard. this may take up to 30 mins. The syrup is lovely drizzled over the granola and pear but not necessary

spoon a small amount of natural yogurt into a bowl and place warm pear on top. Then sprinkle generously with granola

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Red Onion and Walnut Tart

April 13, 2016

blog.krissyosheaphotography2016-4 blog.krissyosheaphotography2016-7It is said that necessity is the mother of invention and in the case of this recipe, that is exactly what happened.

This invention was born on one of those days of one of those weeks. A white rabbit sort of a week. The kind where you spend the whole week rushing around never knowing quite what day it is and perpetually shouting, either into the phone or just in your own head, “im late! im late”

And then comes Friday, and all you want to do is sigh a great sigh of relief and relax, perhaps pour a little glass of red wine and have something which feels very decent and indulgent on the table.

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