Tag Archives: cottage farm

Vanilla Infused Overnight Oats

February 23, 2019

It’s the dead of winter days here in New England – long and dark. Night still seeps into morning, and that blue black void is hardly conducive to an early start. Beguiled by the warmth of our beds, its often hard to rouse ourselves up and out into the day. But the promise of a warm kitchen and fulfilling breakfast, even on those multi-directional weekday mornings, gives us much needed motivation. We have come to look forward to our darkened mornings, and have become something we each look forward to when the alarm goes off. This winter we have successfully won back breakfast with an incredibly simple but satisfying breakfast ritual. At its core is an age old combination – whole milk and oats. These two stalwarts of breakfast certainly become more than the sum of their parts with the addition of made in Maine Oakhurst Dairy whole milk and a sweetly modern twist on the bowl of porridge.

The frigid tempratures make hearty breakfasts a New England necessity but these overnight oats have made it something much more acheivable and enjoyable this winter. They easily lend themselves to the hurried mornings (even more hurried with Ruairí now in the mix), a simple stir and toss on of toppings (my favorites suggested below) and these vanilla overnight oats, creamy with whole milk from Oakhurst Dairy and elevated from the heady scent and exotic flavors of cinnamon and vanilla. These last months we have nurtured our new ritual of breakfast together, just us three in the kitchen, a steaming kettle on the table and bowls of these overnight oats at hand. And with just a bit of practice (most of the work comes the night before, infusing the milk and combining it with the oats) we have easily gotten the hang of weekday breakfasts together. Starting the day with a little goodness has made all the difference this winter. And getting to watch the sun come up, cresting the stone wall and flooding through the house as been an added bonus

ingredients

  • 3 cups Oakhurst whole milk
  • 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats, rinsed
  • 2 whole vanilla beans
  • 2 cinnamon sticks, about 3″ each
  • 2 Tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup raw buckwheat
  • 1 Tablespoon butter
  • salt

instructions

Run the tip of a very sharp knife length wise down each vanilla bean, scoring the skin on one side and opening up gently to reveal the seeds. In a medium sauce pan place the Oakhurst whole milk, vanilla beans, cinnamon sticks and dark brown sugar

infuse the milk over low heat for about 30 minutes, you should see a little steam rising off the top of the milk but do not let it simmer or boil. While the milk is infusing, place oats in a strainer and rinse under cool water using your finger tips to scrub the oats. Let them drain well then place them in a large bowl with a pinch of salt. Toss to combine

Once infused, remove milk from the heat and let stand a few minutes to cool. Then transfer two cups of the milk to the oats along with the cinnamon sticks and vanilla beans. Stir well to combine, cover and store in the refrigerator overnight until breakfast the next morning.

Reserve remaining cup of milk for a before bed treat or to top the oats when serving.

For the toasted buckwheat. Place butter and a pinch of salt in a pan over medium low heat. When the butter begins to bubble, add the buckwheat to the pan and toss well with the butter. Cook, stirring continuously about 5 minutes or until the buckwheat is browned and nutty smelling. Remove from the pan and let cool. Once cool, buckwheat can be stored in an air tight container on the counter for up to one week.

To serve: Remove overnight oats from the refrigerator and stir well. If desired, they can be heated in a sauce pan over medium or simply served straight from the refrigerator. Top with a splash of the remaining reserved milk (also heated if desired) and a sprinkling of the toasted kasha. Fruit, fruit compote (im loving blood orange right now), a swirl of your favorite jam, toasted nuts or seeds can also be an nice addition

This post is sponsored in part by Oakhurst Dairy. all thoughts and opinions are my own

Holiday Gingerbread biscuits

December 21, 2018

I have always loved the way an image, if captured correctly, can be emotive and intimate. It’s power to wordlessly convey a moment and lead the viewer to imagine a whole world inside the frame. But for the last little while, I have been wondering what it would be like, what it could look like, to share an experience with the viewer. A few weeks ago, I got the chance to find out. The video above is the result of a collaboration with the wonderfully talented Dylan Leavitt of Studio Dylan  -without whom, none of this would have been possible! I could not be more delighted to share the making of our holiday gingerbread with you in this very first video for Cottage Farm. I would love to hear what you think in the comments below.

And for those of you left feeling inspired to make these scrummy holiday biscuits – the recipe for these beautiful gingerbread is below.

Wishing you and your’s the very happiest of holidays .

xx

Krissy

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rhubarb skillet cake

May 3, 2018

This recipe is the result of one of those happy accident moments. The kind where you set out with one intention and are left with an entirely different (read not bad, just not expected) result. What started as a batch of scones, somewhere along the way lost its true scone-ness and became instead this equally good but different skillet cake. The very first round wasn’t good exactly but it held the promise of possibility and to my mind that warrants, if nothing else, at least another try. You see, I’m a big believer in happy accidents, in leaving room for magic and the promise of possibility, both in life and in the kitchen. It is precisely the potential in these between spaces that keep the everyday interesting, exciting and fresh. If I don’t leave space for the unexpected or what I more fondly prefer to think of as an everyday sort of magic I find that is when a staleness creeps in and a rigidity of routine and shortsightedness creeps in. This quickly becomes stifling and a vicious cycle which leads to nowhere except feeling uninspired and not being able to see the elegance in the everyday. And so back to our skillet cake. No, it did not turn out to be a batch of scones and yes the first incarnation of the batter was, quite frankly a runny, gummy disaster, but I baked it anyway and tasted and what I found was that I loved the flavors and the hearty delicateness of the cake. There was spark of something there, a hit that something more was possible, and so a few tweaks and few more tests and this lovely rhubarb skillet cake became something all its own. 

It’s perfect to use up the glut of rhubarb this time of year and a lovely fluffy breakfast or brunch dish (of course you could serve it with fresh berried and a dollop of cream for dessert too) sort of thing. It comes together incredibly quickly with rather little effort, especially if using a food processor. But, you don’t need one to make it. And as it bakes the smell fills the kitchen and permeates the rooms beyond adding only to the magic of these brightly light spring mornings 

Breakfast Rhubarb Skillet Cake

  • 2C | 250g flour
  • 1/4C | 65g sugar
  • 1 TBSP baking powder
  • 5 TBSP | 74g butter
  • 1 C |150g Rhubarb – sugared with scant 3 Tbsp / 35g
  • 1/2 C + 1T buttermilk
  • 1 egg
  • 1 ½ tsp vanilla
  • demerara sugar or other course grained sugar for sprinkling over the top plus a Tbsp or so extra buttermilk (optional)
  1. preheat your oven to 425F/ 220C
  2. grease a 9″ pie dish or round baking pan, line the bottom with a circle of parchment.
  3. Slice rhubarb stock into 1/4″ or so discs and toss with the 3 T | 35g sugar
  4. in a food processor or large bowl combine the flour, 1/4C|65g sugar, baking powder, butter. Pulse together until the texture of peas and turn out into a large bowl. Do not over work, some chunks of butter is ok. If doing it by hand, rub butter into the flour mixture with the tip of your fingers.
  5. toss the rhubarb with the flour and mix to coat well. make a well at the center of the dry mixture and add in the buttermilk. Stir to combine, then add the egg lightly beaten and vanilla. stir until everything is just combined and turn out the mixture into the baking pan
  6. with the back of a spoon spread mixture evenly in the pan and score crosswise about 6 times
  7. Brush the top with a little extra buttermilk and sprinkle with demerara sugar
  8. Bake 30-35 mins

A Spring Wardrobe Update and Giveaway with J.Jill

April 9, 2018

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It’s no secret that I favor effortless everyday essentials in my home and in my wardrobe. Nor is it that I prefer a few stylish, practical and comfortable pieces – give me a good white button down any day! – over a wardrobe crammed to the gills with items rarely worn or too particular.

These preferences coupled with the rather demanding daily requirements of my career as photographer, recipe developer, stylist – mean I want items in my closet that are functional and layer seamlessly with one another. I like lots of choice from just a few items, and those pieces must also be chic and polished. I want pieces that look elegant and make me feel that way, even when Im elbow-deep in a bucket of flowers in a warehouse at 5am.

Naturally, I was thrilled to learn about J.Jill’s collection pieces. Each month just a few pieces are released and in turn those pieces compliment the rest of the line. I like to think of them as elevated pieces for my capsule wardrobe. April’s collection pieces could not be better timed as I look to reinvigorate my wardrobe. I will be adding a key piece or two that I know will carry me through this season of transition here in New England and through the entire spring.  As a company with its roots in New England, J.Jill seems to perfectly understand the need for versatility in a spring wardrobe with easy essentials, perfect for layering on and off as the temperatures spike and dip.  J.Jills style is versatile, a style for life and their pieces gracefully help me shift into the spring season.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2018-12On a particularly brisk morning recently, I made an early run to the flower market in search of blooms to fill the city cottage ahead of the weekend. And while I knew rows of stunning blooms would be there waiting, there is nothing like spring flower season,  I also knew it would be quite chilly. I popped on the Tab Sleeved Top  from  J.Jills recently released April collection and donned an extra layer in the Drawstring Jacket (love its many pockets!) and headed out in search of a few bundles of flowers.cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2018cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2018-9cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2018-11cottagefarm.krissyosheaphotography.2018-2

Give Away is now closed. Congratulations to the winner of the give aways Sonya. J.Jill is generously providing a $300 gift card to one luck reader. To enter please leave a comment below telling us what essentials you love for Spring. (Open to legal US residents only) winner will be chosen at random in one week. In addition, a small donation has been made to the J.Jill Compassion Fund which that helps support community-based organizations who assist disadvantaged and homeless women on their path to self-sufficiency.

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This post is in partnership with J.Jill. All thoughts and opinions are my own

Gotland Workshop 2017: A Recap

January 19, 2018

 The light in Gotland is unlike the light anywhere else, or anywhere I’ve ever been. Silvery, mercurial nearly translucent even in the height of summer, at noon. Perhaps is because Gotland is an island, surrounded by the reflective powers of the sea but whatever it is, the light of Gotland is something in a realm unto itself and a photographers dream.

Our farmhouse home during the workshop made it even easier to love the light – with its soft plaster walls, heavy stone sills and perfectly directed windows.  Thought and care had clearly been put into the building and more importantly the position of the building just so as to capture every last single liquid drop of light. It easily enticed the first few slivers of daylight and ensnared the last rays of evening. Its painted floors bounced light into all corners including the eves of the most charming room in the house  – a whitewashed bunk room of sorts with sheepskin rugs and blue ticked duvets. Scandinavian to the letter and charming beyond measure. continue reading

roasted acorn squash and orange corriander lentils

October 19, 2017

lately I have been feeling a persistent restlessness

when I’m in the city, I long for the country but when I find myself among the fields and gardens of the farm, I yearn for that urban hum and bustle

In the company of others I imagine a sublime solitude and in those moments of separateness, I find myself seeking the company of others – jovial conversations and long drawn out dinners with friends.

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Summer Granita with Smith Teamaker & Stone Fruit

August 21, 2017

The thing with old properties is you are part of their story as much as they are a part of yours. It is a matter of stewardship rather than ownership, of learning how to live with them rather than in them. And you must get comfortable with the traces of other people’s lives, other people’s stories – for they are part of the story of the house. There is a kind of soulfulness in these traces they are part of what gives the house the depth, and that palpable personality I gravitate toward. continue reading

Grilled Eggplant with Sansho & Yuzu

July 26, 2017

There are certain things synonymous with summer. A mixture of childhood rituals, nostalgia, ideas I’ve collected and things I’ve lived along the way. Many center around activities like swimming in cool green salty water and the rest, unsurprisingly, around food – looking up from sandy beach seats to watch bi-planes pulling banners white against pure blue summer skies; the cooing of morning doves in the hot dawn; blueberry muffin making and black raspberry ice-cream in hand rolled sugar cones after dinner. continue reading

2017 Gotland Workshop

May 19, 2017

 Join us this August (23rd – 26th) for four days of photography, styling, foraging, creativity and exploration. Together Olivia @Adelasterfoodtextures & I will be hosting an intimate workshop on the charming Swedish island of Gotland.  

Here in this historic Swedish holiday destination, we will spend our days exploring the creative process, the basics of camera mechanics, food styling, and the visual narrative. We will be joined by guest teacher Linda Lomelino for an afternoon tea. She will share her beautiful expertise of baking, styling and creating a cookbook over the course of the afternoon. There will be a hands-on styling demonstration with Linda and a Q&A as we enjoy a leisurely time at our ‘afternoon tea table’. In addition to spending time creating at our rambling Swedish farmhouse, we will make an excursion into the world heritage town Visby, lunch at one of the island’s restaurants and an afternoon wander at the island’s herb farm.

As we explore the local food and cultural landscape of Gotland, there will be ample consideration and guidance in the art of the photographic narrative and the composition of the lifestyle photograph. With photo-rich opportunities abound, Olivia will guide us through an afternoon of making herbs and flowers into tonics, teas, scrubs and skincare to use at home. She will also lead attendees who share an interest of wild food on a walk identifying wild plants and keeping a watchful eye for the unique and “only native to Gotland’, Salma berries.

We are also incredibly excited to offer an optional yoga session each morning to further cultivate a space for personal reflection, and stillness. Weather you this will be your first time or you have years of experience, we hope it will bring another dimension to our time on Gotland. Yoga has been a part of Krissy’s life and creative practice now for 5 years and she could not be more delighted to be able to share some of the joys of this style of bodywork with participants. Sessions will be taught in English by a Swedish instructor.

With days packed full of inspiring opportunities for creativity, styling, cooking and photography; mornings and evenings will focus on the simple joys of gathering, sharing meals and the camaraderie of conversation. Sharing plant-centric meals, together round the table, this will be a time to reflect, relax and ask questions about everything from social media to pitching freelance work. This will also be a time to explore the needs of attendees, whether you are just starting out and looking to focus on developing a personal style and learning how to find work or are more experienced and looking for new opportunities in the industry, with a focus on working from anywhere in the world.Olivia and Krissy are also presenting attendees with the very unique opportunity to have a preparation call before the workshop and to have our week’s work followed up with a 4 month portfolio review. Krissy and Olivia will review your work four months after the conclusion of the workshop via skype should you like. Giving you time to address those questions as you continue creating at home.  

We hope you will join us in Gotland, Sweden this August! We look forward to meeting you.

Details:

 

SOLD OUT

– Dates: 23rd – 26th August 2017

–  Gotland, Sweden

SOLD OUT

Please know that all baths in our farmhouse are shared

– 11 participants

– 4 days of food and lifestyle photography and instruction

– 3 breakfasts/brunch

–  3 dinners

– all entry and tickets for activities

– 4 month Follow up Portfolio Review with Olivia & Krissy  

 

Materials, meals and three nights accommodation covered in the cost of the ticket

Nearest major airports are Gotland, Malmo, further afield Stockholm

Daily ferries from the mainland to the ferry

Please note, airfare, ferry and transportation to the workshop is not included in the ticket price

Deposit of 50% is needed for registration and a final payment will be due August 1, 2017.

There will be no refunds or cancellation. So please ensure you are able to attend before registering

For reservation or more details please contact: krissyoshea@gmail.com

Who can attend:

Anyone with an interest in food, photography or visiting Sweden. Anyone looking for inspiration, a chance to immerse themselves creatively or steel a few days away and shore themselves against a bucolic coastal landscape. Photography beginners and advanced photographers will enjoy this experience equally. For the more advanced photographers and stylists we can angle it towards professional development and industry opportunities in Sweden.

  • Olivia has worked as a photographer and stylist in Australia and upon returning to her native country Sweden hosted a restaurant pop up in nature. She also continued to work with photography and has exhibited her non food related photography in Australia and Sweden. Much of the food she makes has some elements of wild ingredients.

  • Krissy O’Shea is a freelance photographer and stylist. After receiving her MFA in Photography from San Francisco Arts Institute, she moved to London and worked in editorial and events. She now resides in New England working as a freelance photographer, stylist, recipe developer and event designer. She is passionate about food and design and writes about it all on her popular lifestyle blog, CottageFarmblog.com.     

Roasted Cauliflower & Herb Salad

April 20, 2017

There is something to the austerity of winter that makes the bounty of spring feel indulgent. With its relentless cold dark days, heavy wet snow and endless parade of root vegetables, those first few bright green things of spring seem positively fanciful. Vivid colors abound, curls, tendrils, feathery tips, sweet delicate flavors spring, unsurprisingly, is very bewitching indeed.

We put the screens in the windows and doors at the farm the other day. A simple gesture, albeit not a simple task, signaling a time of year when days are spent with the windows flung open and the cool (often still downright chilly) clean air rushes through the house; working its way into all the corners and blowing out the last cobwebs of winter. continue reading