Category Archives: Recipes

Vegetable Buddha Bowl

January 28, 2019

I wanted to start the year off with an easy, everyday recipe. This soba noodle bowl is a favorite weeknight meal and full of earthy satisfying flavors balanced with lots of bright crunchy toppings. It is fairly quick to come together but also extremely adaptable to whatever ingredients you may have on hand. Because of this adaptability, it’s something we make often whatever the season (believe it or not, its not all cheese and cakes here at Cottage Farm). Brown rice or quinoa could be substituted for the soba – kale or spinach for the rapini – tofu or egg for the tempeh. This bowl is good hot or cold too so it’s not time dependent. And now, with the little one, I often make it up in stages (cooking a few extra greens the night before etc) then just assemble everything. It lends itself to all sorts of combinations. The unifying element is the sesame dressing – I came across it in a recipe by Heidi Swanson from one of her brilliant cookbooks and now use it so often – I’ve lightly adapted her version and use it here as both marinade and dressing.

The pickled red cabbage is another kitchen staple, a jar is nearly always going in the fridge. Slice the red cabbage thinly in whatever amount and cover with a mixture of half white vinegar, half warm water plus a tablespoon or two each of sugar and teaspoon or so of salt to taste. I let it sit at least an hour before using. Whatever isn’t used, goes into a jar along with the brine and keeps for about a week in the fridge

I love to top out these buddha bowls with all sorts of seeds, nuts, finely sliced green onions, micro greens, spicy radish – really any of the goodies that happen to be at hand – as I said, this bowl is highly adaptable

If available, I’m partial to the 100% buckwheat noodles and their dense nutty flavor. The noodles that include a wheat blend don’t really have the same flavor or texture. A note on cooking the buckwheat noodles – watch them very carefully as they go gluey very easily. Typically I cook them a minute or so less than the packet instructions. Be sure to rinse them under cool water – using your fingers to sort of scrub away the starch.

Vegetarian Buddha Bowl

serves 2

Ingredients

  • 100% buckwheat soba noodles, cooked according to the package instructions
  • 1 package organic tempeh
  • 1 small bunch rapini
  • 3 cups shiitake mushroom caps
  • pickled red cabbage (see notes above)
  • 3/4 cup micro greens, sprouts or pea shoots, lightly packed
  • 3 green onions, green parts only, thinly sliced
  • 1 Tablespoon black sesame seeds for garnish
  • 2 Tablespoons shoyu
  • 1 Tablespoons toasted sesame oil
  • 4 Tablespoons olive oil

pre-heat oven to 400

on the stove top, place a large pot of boiling water

to make the dressing – pour the shoyu, toasted sesame oil and olive oil into a jar with a tight fitting lid, wrap in a dish towel and shake vigerously until well combined

brush tempeh generously on each side with the dressing and place in the oven to bake about 10 minutes, turning over halfway through

remove woody stems from mushrooms, place caps on a parchment lined baking sheet, drizzle lightly with olive oil and a sprinkle of salt. Bake along with the tempeh about 7 minutes until browned

trim ends of the rapini and cut into 2 inch sections, leaving the florettes whole. Drop the rapini into the pan of boiling water for 3 minutes or until just softened. Remove from the water with a slotted spoon and set aside to cool. Return the water to a boil and cook the soba noodles according to package directions (see note above) You can also cook soba in a separate pan if desired.

place a portion of the noodles in the bottom of each bowl – divide portions of the tempeh, rapini and mushrooms between the two bowls. Drizzle each with a tablespoon or so of the remaining dressing. then top each bowl, as desired with the pickled cabbage, green onions, micro greens and a sprinkle of sesame seeds

serve immediately

Holiday Gingerbread biscuits

December 21, 2018

I have always loved the way an image, if captured correctly, can be emotive and intimate. It’s power to wordlessly convey a moment and lead the viewer to imagine a whole world inside the frame. But for the last little while, I have been wondering what it would be like, what it could look like, to share an experience with the viewer. A few weeks ago, I got the chance to find out. The video above is the result of a collaboration with the wonderfully talented Dylan Leavitt of Studio Dylan  -without whom, none of this would have been possible! I could not be more delighted to share the making of our holiday gingerbread with you in this very first video for Cottage Farm. I would love to hear what you think in the comments below.

And for those of you left feeling inspired to make these scrummy holiday biscuits – the recipe for these beautiful gingerbread is below.

Wishing you and your’s the very happiest of holidays .

xx

Krissy

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Butternut Squash Mini Tartlettes

December 15, 2018

Ours is a house of perpetual motion, especially at the holidays, with a welcome stream of visitors coming through the door hopefully unannounced and preferably in parties of three or more. Often, they arrive with little packages tucked up under their arms or with a platter of just baked this or that to share as we pour cups of coffee or tea or wine depending on the time of day. There is an everyday magic that comes with these visitors and whether its known to them or not, their mere presence has transformative powers as it makes this old house feel full and warm and alive. The hum of chatter through the rooms, the clinking of glasses, the sounds of another log being placed on the fire all create such a rich holiday atmosphere. continue reading

APPLE GALETTE WITH CARDAMOM CRUST

October 19, 2018

I love greeting the first few chilly mornings of autumn and can usually be found, shoulders wrapped, sitting in the kitchen alone with the steely blue light, hands clasped around a mug of tea. These moments of transition are always my most favorite. My attention pointed sharply at the changes happening, in the light, in the air, in the smell of the earth. There is no time like those first few days of a new season to awaken the senses and renew faith in the beauty of this life.The kettle seems to take just a bit longer to boil in the cooler kitchen and in those few extra moments I find my mind wandering to thoughts of cinnamon scented breads, oven roasted pumpkin and pots of soup on the stove. My closet and spice cabinet are inevitably rotated, those summer things, those summery flavors moving to the back in favor of the warmth of sweaters and cardamom pods.  Though our garden is waning I know there will be lots of lovely things at the farmers market soon and I’m looking forward to the new seasons produce. Nothing quite captivates me or captures the essence of the season here in New England, quite like apples. I unabashedly devour them in everything – soups, salads, roasted, raw, sweet, savory. I fairly live for that first bite into the first apple of the autumn season. Of course that’s first bite is even better on a slightly crisp, sweater needed, sunny, orangish leafy sort of day. Below is the recipe for a lovely rustic galette – just the sort of thing I find myself wanting to make when that unavoidable pull of the universe calls for baking.I like to use a mix of apples for this galette , skins on, textures and flavors all melding together. I also shy away from store-bought in favor of more local, older school varieties of apples. I find the flavors richer and the textures more diversified. Check out the local farmers markets or farm stands – I like Macs, Macoun, Cortland and Cox.

Apple Galette

350 for 55-60 min

Crust (adapted from the brilliant Linda Lomelino

  • 1 2/3 Cups or 200g flour
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2/3 Cup or 150g very cold butter
  • 1 tsp fresh ground cardamom
  • 4-5 Tbsp ice water

 

Filling

  • 4 medium sized / 725 g mixed apples 
  • ¼ cup or 35g golden raisins
  • Zest ½ orange & ½ lemon
  • Juice of half an orange, 3Tbsp
  • Juice half a lemon, 1Tbsp
  • 1Tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 Tbsp heavy cream or milk (to wash the edges of the crust)
  • plus more granular sugar for topping

instructions:

to make the crust – mix flour, sugar, salt and cardamom together in a large bowl. Begin with very cold butter and finely dice butter with a knife or finely slice with a cheese slicer (a trick i learned from Linda Lomelino)

gently rub butter with clean hands into the dry mixture until it is combined and resembles the texture of wet sand. Some larger pea sized pieces of butter are ok.

Slowly add the iced water, one tablespoon at a time, until the dough just comes together to form a ball. Pat into a disc and wrap in wax paper and a clean kitchen towel. place in the refrigerator to chill at least 30 minutes or up to 24 hours

To make the Galette – Preheat the oven to 350

slice apples into 1/8″ thick slices, cores removed and skins on. Then toss the apple slices with the zest, juice, cinnamon, sugar and raisins.

remove dough from refrigerator and let stand a few minutes or until its easily rolled out but not warm. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough until its about 13″ in diameter. Carefully transfer to a parchment lined 9″ pie pan or baking sheet.

add the apple mixture on top of the dough (arrange in a fan pattern if desired, or simply pile it on) leaving about 2 1/2″ from the edge with no filling.

carefully fold up the edge all the way around and press a little to seal. Brush on the milk or cream across the top of the folded edge and sprinkle generously with granulated sugar. this will help the edges brown nicely

Pop the galette into the oven and bake 55 – 60 minutes our until the crust is cooked. You may need to cover the center apples with a bit of extra baking parchment if the edges begin to catch.

Remove from the oven and let stand about 10 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature

Summer Grilled Sandwich

July 4, 2018

In New England, the celebrations surrounding the 4th of July are palpable; parades, center of town concerts, strawberry shortcake festivals. Weeks in advance, the white clapboard houses lining the proverbial main street, north street and south street don their festive regalia in preparation for independence day celebrations. Flags and buntings unfurl from their wintry storage places, with a brisk dusting off, they begin to don the front porches and entryways of various houses. Planters and hanging baskets begin to fill with red white and blue petunia or begonia and window boxes are outfitted with miniature flags on little gold-capped wooden sticks, the very same that line the brick pathways leading from street to the front doors of many houses this time of year. While the 4th of July conjures this very specific imagery, it celebrations also manifest in the form of backyard picnics, cookouts and potlucks.

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rhubarb skillet cake

May 3, 2018

This recipe is the result of one of those happy accident moments. The kind where you set out with one intention and are left with an entirely different (read not bad, just not expected) result. What started as a batch of scones, somewhere along the way lost its true scone-ness and became instead this equally good but different skillet cake. The very first round wasn’t good exactly but it held the promise of possibility and to my mind that warrants, if nothing else, at least another try. You see, I’m a big believer in happy accidents, in leaving room for magic and the promise of possibility, both in life and in the kitchen. It is precisely the potential in these between spaces that keep the everyday interesting, exciting and fresh. If I don’t leave space for the unexpected or what I more fondly prefer to think of as an everyday sort of magic I find that is when a staleness creeps in and a rigidity of routine and shortsightedness creeps in. This quickly becomes stifling and a vicious cycle which leads to nowhere except feeling uninspired and not being able to see the elegance in the everyday. And so back to our skillet cake. No, it did not turn out to be a batch of scones and yes the first incarnation of the batter was, quite frankly a runny, gummy disaster, but I baked it anyway and tasted and what I found was that I loved the flavors and the hearty delicateness of the cake. There was spark of something there, a hit that something more was possible, and so a few tweaks and few more tests and this lovely rhubarb skillet cake became something all its own. 

It’s perfect to use up the glut of rhubarb this time of year and a lovely fluffy breakfast or brunch dish (of course you could serve it with fresh berried and a dollop of cream for dessert too) sort of thing. It comes together incredibly quickly with rather little effort, especially if using a food processor. But, you don’t need one to make it. And as it bakes the smell fills the kitchen and permeates the rooms beyond adding only to the magic of these brightly light spring mornings 

Breakfast Rhubarb Skillet Cake

  • 2C | 250g flour
  • 1/4C | 65g sugar
  • 1 TBSP baking powder
  • 5 TBSP | 74g butter
  • 1 C |150g Rhubarb – sugared with scant 3 Tbsp / 35g
  • 1/2 C + 1T buttermilk
  • 1 egg
  • 1 ½ tsp vanilla
  • demerara sugar or other course grained sugar for sprinkling over the top plus a Tbsp or so extra buttermilk (optional)
  1. preheat your oven to 425F/ 220C
  2. grease a 9″ pie dish or round baking pan, line the bottom with a circle of parchment.
  3. Slice rhubarb stock into 1/4″ or so discs and toss with the 3 T | 35g sugar
  4. in a food processor or large bowl combine the flour, 1/4C|65g sugar, baking powder, butter. Pulse together until the texture of peas and turn out into a large bowl. Do not over work, some chunks of butter is ok. If doing it by hand, rub butter into the flour mixture with the tip of your fingers.
  5. toss the rhubarb with the flour and mix to coat well. make a well at the center of the dry mixture and add in the buttermilk. Stir to combine, then add the egg lightly beaten and vanilla. stir until everything is just combined and turn out the mixture into the baking pan
  6. with the back of a spoon spread mixture evenly in the pan and score crosswise about 6 times
  7. Brush the top with a little extra buttermilk and sprinkle with demerara sugar
  8. Bake 30-35 mins

poached rhubarb and two superfood sprinkles

April 5, 2018

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“Well thats a sure sign of spring” the woman uttered as, unloading my basket, I handed her a fistful of slender bright pink rhubarb stalks. And its true, rhubarb is perhaps the one thing that emphatically signals the transition into the spring growing season. That, and possibly fiddlehead ferns, the elusive (once wild grown only, now cultivated) foretellers of spring’s arrival in New England. So in fact, my clutch of rhubarb really did warrant the elated, if not somewhat surprised response from the woman at the market.

Rhubarb, I have found, is also one of those items a bit like cilantro, either loved or hated. I fall unequivocally into the yes, can’t get enough rhubarb camp. In sweet or savory (see my rye berry salad with pickled rhubarb here) its equally austere and unique with a  flavor that can’t really be nailed down but you know it when you taste it. Eyes closed, I would always know its was rhubarb.  continue reading

Spring Green Bread Salad with La Brea Bakery

March 20, 2018

This year, spring has been slow in coming and only just now is it beginning to show itself. The slightest hints are trickling in at the markets, tucked amongst the wintry root vegetables are a few tender green stalks of asparagus and the brilliant pinky reds of slender rhubarb. But even still, as these items shyly make their way to market, there is snow on the ground and low digits temperatures awaiting us each day. Winter’s persistence has me reluctant to shun it’s comforting meals just yet but I do so long for those first few tastes of spring. So, I’ve folded the two seasons into one to create the recipe below – A spring green bread salad. It ticks all the boxes, fresh and light with distinct flavors of the new season and a nourishing hearty backbone. This delicious backbone comes from one of my favorite foods, really beautifully made bread. Give me all the crisp crusts and invitingly chewy centers and I couldn’t be happier.  La Brea Bakery breads, with their Big Sky Montana grown single origin wheats and stunning sourdough starter create some truly wonderful artisan breads. And their Reserve sourdough demi-baguette  was the perfect choice for this recipe, crisping up beautifully in the oven. La Brea Bakery breads are consistently delicious and accessible nationally (something else I love!) and they have been using the same starter since 1989. Look out for their new Reserve breads like the sourdough in this recipe at Krogers Markets specialty cheese counters – distinguished cheeses and artisan breads in one place, yes please. Find out more here & look for a little coupon too! continue reading

chocolate pasta with a brown butter hazelnut sauce

February 14, 2018

Valentines day tends to be a blur of petals, paper and chocolate. And so, years ago we decided to take the mania out of the day and try to really embrace the true sentiment of it all – a  sentiment that at its core, without all the fluff and pink and red ribbony, is genuine.  It is a unique moment each year to celebrate one of the sweetest delights of the everyday, love. Not the ambiguous, cerebral sort, but the specific, deep down sort of love that is given freely and wantonly. For us, valentines day has become a moment to pause and make an effort to give ourselves over to just being together, intentionally making space to honor that everyday love that we have built together over the last twelve years. Of course, it could be said that this should be done everyday, and I do agree, but life is messy, complicated, quick and does not always lend itself to acts of celebrating. So really, I embrace this as time to stop and celebrate, enjoy and revel in the love part.  We try to spend the most amount of time together in one of our favorite places, doing something that we enjoy and elevating it just a bit to feel celebratory – this inevitably means time together in the kitchen. We have cooked some incredible meals over the past decade (a seriously gorgeous cioppino in SanFrancisco and  handmade pizzas on the grill in a New England snow storm may top the list) and have had more fun than we ever did rushing to reservations at overly crowded, maxed out restaurants. continue reading

Roast Cauliflower with Crispy Caper, Jalapeno & Olive 

January 29, 2018

Cauliflower is often on the menu here. In fact, it is rather affectionately nicknamed  – “the king of vegetables” if that gives you any idea how much love there is for cauliflower in our kitchen. And this roast cauliflower with capers and jalapeno is one of our go-to meals. A simple one pan dish (little cleanup = always a winner ) its a meal that is satisfying on those cold wintry nights and not so time-consuming, i.e. perfect to be made on a weeknight. It fills the house with warming aromas and is good at chasing those chilly empty spots from the belly that always seem to creep up in subzero temps.

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